The World’s Best Engineering Schools

From the Business Insider:

Some of the best engineering schools in the world serve as feeder programs for the best technology companies out there, like Facebook, Google, and Apple.

So, which school is most likely to land you the job you want?

Over the past few weeks, we’ve conducted a survey to find out the true ranking of the top 50 schools. The top school in the world, from our survey, is the California Institute of Technology.

Jump right to the list >

All these schools have comparable high-quality academics, smart professors, and great campuses. But when it comes to figuring out the value of an engineering school, there’s only one thing that really matters: The amount the school will help your future career.

Of our 723 respondents to the survey, nearly all (91%) said they had a computer science, engineering or equivalent degree.

The two most important things that went into choosing an engineering school were the skills and knowledge they acquired in school (73.9%) and the brand value of the school (18.8%).

The majority of the respondents (66.8%) studied and applied the C, C++ or C# programming languages, with Java following as a close second (40.8%).

Most engineers who responded were either research scientists (10.8%), mobile developers (8.9%) or mechanical engineers (13.3%).

Here’s the methodology:

  • Our initial list was compiled by canvassing engineers, industry professionals and entrepreneurs who work at some of the most popular technology companies.
  • We asked respondents to grade schools on a 1 (not valuable) to 5 (most valuable) scale. The score is the average of all responses across those scales.
  • Each survey included grades for at least 10 schools. Respondents could also write in responses to the survey for schools that were not included. Some write-ins with overwhelming response were included in the rankings.
  • We parsed LinkedIn to find the top employers for each school, and they are in order of greatest number of graduates employed per school.

Click here to check out the top 50 engineering schools >

Surf the Wave in Oregon for Power

This just crossed my desk tonight, while Walker Engineering doesn’t work directly with power projects we have a passing interest in what goes on in Oregon in emerging technology.  The idea of harvesting power from wave action has got to be, on the surface (pun intended), one of the most interesting developments recently.

Read the complete story on KATU.com.

 

The size of a PowerBuoy, seen here sitting on a dock in Scotland, is evident by comparing the size of the employee, right, to the buoy. The company says Oregon’s will look exactly the same. (Photo courtesy: Ocean Power Technologies Inc. Used with permission)

Standing Workstations: Sitting down all day is killing you

Get off your butt and make some tea if you want to live

By Simon Sharwood, Posted in Science, 27th March 2012 07:11 GMT

I am writing this blog entry at a standing workstation which a lot of people still view as an oddity despite the data provided in each study that is being published.  I realize this is published on The Register and that makes it always worth investigating, the study is remarkably similar to those I have reviewed before.

A study of more than 220,000 people aged 45 or more has come to a startling conclusion: sitting down all day is killing you.

The 45 and Up study compared mortality rates among those who sit for many hours a day and those who spend less time perched on their posterior.

The study used “… questionnaire data from 222 497 individuals 45 years or older from the 45 and Up Study to mortality data from the New South Wales Registry of Births, Deaths, and Marriages (Australia) from February 1, 2006, through December 31, 2010.”

The news is bad if you spend more than 11 hours a day sitting: your chance of leaving this plane of existence in the next three years is 40% higher than those who spend less time on their behinds. Even those who sit for just eight hours a day have a 15% “better” chance of death.

The dangers of sitting are not only related to a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. The study also hints at more profound physiological issues created by sitting for many hours a day, as doing so means the body is deprived of many internal triggers that spark beneficial actions in the body. Even standing a few more times a day, the research says, can therefore improve health. Hence our plea for tea in the subheading.

"Shorter sitting times and sufficient physical activity are independently protective against all-cause mortality not just for healthy individuals but also for those with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, overweight, or obesity," the study’s authors wrote in Archives of Internal Medicine, where the results of the study were published this week.

If you’re sitting while reading this, what are you waiting for?